L.A. Law?


Recently a local bloger has once again been decrying ideas that differ from theirs, stating, “As I am a firm believer in the people’s right to vote, especially when it comes to our assets, I am disturbed at what has and is taking place within our City.”

They go on to implore, “Some of these people mean well but what happened to our fundamental right under the Constitution? We ALL own these assets.”

Falling back on the position that somehow their Constitutional rights are being violated is an emotional and appealing thought. However it is far from true. As we were all taught in civics class (or what ever it is called nowadays) our government is a Republic, not a Democracy.  Hence the pledge of allegiance begins with, “I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States and to the republic for which it stands. . .”

Simply put, our Republic is based on a representative form of government governed by the rule of law.

James Madison had these thoughts when writing the Federalist Papers in 1787:

From this view of the subject it may be concluded that a pure democracy, by which I mean a society consisting of a small number of citizens, who assemble and administer the government in person, can admit of no cure for the mischiefs of faction. A common passion or interest will, in almost every case, be felt by a majority of the whole; a communication and concert result from the form of government itself; and there is nothing to check the inducements to sacrifice the weaker party or an obnoxious individual. Hence it is that such democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths. Theoretic politicians, who have patronized this species of government, have erroneously supposed that by reducing mankind to a perfect equality in their political rights, they would, at the same time, be perfectly equalized and assimilated in their possessions, their opinions, and their passions.

The Constitution gives us the framework for a representative government that still is valid today. To say that since we cannot vote on all matters that the Constitution is not being upheld is misguided at best.  We all have access to our elected officials to express our views, and most importantly we elect them to govern in our interest as the Constitution calls for.

lalaw

Advertisements
Explore posts in the same categories: Uncategorized

Tags: , , , ,

You can comment below, or link to this permanent URL from your own site.

2 Comments on “L.A. Law?”

  1. Wes Blackman Says:

    I see one of our “founding mothers” made it the painting. I knew she had been around for a long time, but surprised she goes this far back. You make excellent points. Can you say “mob rule?”

  2. tomspage Says:

    Just about the most eloquent way to say mob rule:

    Hence it is that such democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths.

    Madison had a great way with words and they still ring true today.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: